171 results where found for «I Can Trust the Lord»


We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. »
[...]
« These performances were divided in two parts, each lasting around 40 minutes. In one we presented the <i>Cantata of Santa María de Iquique, but that's another story. »
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The Soldier (El soldado)

Song by:
Rafael Alberti (lyrics), Ángel Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« During Christmas 1973, approximately 660 men and 100 women were held as prisoners in the Concepción Regional Stadium. Concentration camp officials allowed us to celebrate Christmas on the pitch. We were in a corner of the pitch and we used the pole vault pit as a stage. »
[...]
« Two professional radio broadcasters were excellent masters of ceremony, combining veiled messages with other more candid ones, all with a hefty dose of humour and good taste. They also recited poems. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Song by:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« During the 1960s the band Quilapayún popularised this old Spanish song in Chile. Víctor Canto and I performed it as a duet in Santiago’s National Stadium, which had been converted into a concentration, torture and extermination camp. Whenever the military allowed us to do so, we would sing it in the locker rooms where we slept, and in the grandstands where we spent much of the day. »
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To Sing by Improvising (Pa’ cantar de un improviso)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
« We made a Venezuelan cuatro from a large plank of wood attached to one of the walls of the "ranch" where we ate. »
[...]
« I had wanted a Venezuelan cuatro ever since Violeta Parra had taught us that Latin American music has no boundaries; she played the cuatro in her songs in a masterly way, which I wanted to imitate. Her children, Ángel Parra and Isabel Parra, had recorded a song in 1970, very charming and catchy, and we wanted to do it: "Pa’ cantar de un improviso" (To sing by improvising). To do so without a cuatro would not be the same. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Experience in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« It was a strong experience for the 13 of us who remained in the barracks, which now seemed so much larger and hushed. We began to tidy up the rooms and the yard, which looked as if a hurricane had swept through the place. The women who had gone left many things in their rooms. »
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Story of the Chair (Historia de la silla)

Song by:
Silvio Rodríguez
Testimony by:
Eduardo Andrés Arancibia Ortiz
Experience in:
« This was one of the songs Silvio Rodríguez sang to us the day he visited the political prisoners in Santiago’s Public Jail in 1990. »
[...]
« No less important are the memories of visits by Joan Manuel Serrat and the concert given to us by Illapu, deploying a full technical array. During my long stretch in prison, I also became acquainted with a cantata by the political prisoners, an anecdote of resistance in the face of the oft-repeated ban of our subversive songs. »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Song by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada(1) recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. »
[...]
« (3) Wild South American camelid, relative of the llama. »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Song by:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing. They gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« Then I remembered Sandro’s song "Después de la guerra" and made the following argument: “All of us are prisoners of war, so everyone can relate to this song”. I recited the words and everyone agreed to sing it, so we rehearsed it all day long. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
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The Letter (La carta)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Experience in:
« We set up a band with a group of fellow prisoners. They were young, university students. One of them had a guitar. »
[...]
« (3) (1917-1967) Arguably the ‘mother’ of the Chilean Nueva Canción and one of the most important Chilean musicians of the 20th century. »
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