163 results where found for «I Can Trust the Lord»


Fifth Symphony

Author:
Ludwig van Beethoven
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« I like all classical music, particularly Beethoven and Mozart. I listen to it all day on Radio Esperanza, on the bus I drive. The passengers like it. But listening to classical music reminds of what happened in prison and it produces a short circuit in me. »
[...]
« I think that perhaps there was a subliminal message behind the use of these works. I see it as a form of intimidation, perhaps because of the dark and dense atmosphere that this music can sometimes have. In fact, when I listen to it, it reminds me of movies and images about the Jewish Holocaust. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Author:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Place & date:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia Ovando, my sister Alejandra Ruiz and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« Predictably there was much emotion: my dad couldn’t believe that we still remembered the lyrics. He said to us, "but where did you get them from?", "How can you remember them?" Even more exciting was to learn that among those present at the tribute was the writer of the song. It was an uncle, comrade, very dear friend, Uncle Popeye Cárdenas. »
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You Can Blame Me (Échame a mí la culpa)

Author:
José Ángel Espinoza, aka Ferrusquillo
Testimony by:
Marcia Scantlebury
« Mexican songs - and this one in particular - have always moved me. When I shared a cell with Miriam Silva, a young woman who belonged to the Communist Youth, arrested by the DINA when she was handing out leaflets on the street, we killed time in an organised fashion to keep ourselves from getting depressed and overcome by anxiety due to an unknown fate. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Gabriela Durand
« I was 18, and already I had been tortured on the rack several times. One day I was with some other comrade prisoners, and as sometimes happened, the guards put some music on. They used to put the radio on, playing popular tunes of the time. For us young people, the songs were a bit corny, but still we enjoyed them; they were a relief. We always kept absolute silence. »
[...]
« I was sitting down, handcuffed, and at some point the song “Volver a los diecisiete” (Return to seventeen) came on; I don’t know if it was the radio or a record being played. A guard came up to me, pulled me up and said: "Look, girl, listen to this song, it’s yours, you revolutionaries; let’s see, sing it!" I told him I couldn’t sing and he said "Yes you can - sing to your comrades, they’re all feeling screwed." »
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The Rain is Falling (Scende la pioggia)

Author:
The Turtles, with new lyrics by Gianni Morandi
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
Place & date:
Cárcel de Los Ángeles, September 1973
« This song was a workhorse for the prisoners. Iván Moscoso sang it, accompanied by a guitar, in a powerful and defiant voice, and the most altruistic among us sung along in the presence of the gendarme guards, in a courtyard that was only for political prisoners. »
[...]
« For me, a prisoner from (the city of) Laja who walked with a cane, it represented a glimmer of hope and being able to say I am still alive, after twice being threatened with death on the very day of the coup (11 September 1973). Every minute, every day represented a victory of one more day over death and the desire to cling to life. This is part of what thousands of comrades had to live through in different circumstances of their lives. »
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La Adelita

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January – February 1974
« This is another song that was performed by the band Los de Chacabuco and was sung in the prisoners’ weekly show. It’s a very old Mexican song that was popular in Chile. It used to be performed in the compound set up by the prisoners, and rehearsed at Los de Chacabuco's venue in the so-called Civic District. Along with the other songs recovered from the historic cassette, this one was also recorded in the group’s aforementioned venue. »
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Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This is the first song on the cassette recorded at the Chacabuco camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, created by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group’s conductor. »
[...]
« Those taking part are named at the beginning of the recording. All ten members of the group took part. The colour photo displayed in other testimonies on the Cantos Cautivos archive shows nine of us, while Antonio was left out due to a framing error. Antonio does appear, along with the rest of the group, in the black-and-white photo included here [in the movie]. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Author:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico of a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. At 28 years of age, I found this title odd but also understandable, in light of the social esteem with which all tribes regard their healers. This tale has its origins there, as does a famous doctors’ strike, but that is another story. »
[...]
« As luck would have it, the person who took delivery of the piece of paper was one of the few non-political prisoners. His name was “Chico Pulento”, a member of the long criminal dynasty of the Fuentes Cancino gang, specialized in illegal gambling. He had been caught in possession of a false identification card and arrested under suspicion of being a “subversive”. Pulento knew nothing about the political prisoners’ organization, so he turned to his only friend of that group, a Mexican known as “Toluca”, who, in turn, handed the piece of paper to me. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« Keep in mind that the prisoners included farm workers, miners and intellectuals. So if you put on classical music for an old guy from the hills, he would say “What’s that?” Or, if you played Mexican corridos for the intellectuals or pseudo-intellectuals, they might not like it much. »
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Dona Nobis Pacem

Author:
Text from Agnus Dei (Roman Catholic Mass); music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Place & date:
« Music was always present in my family. My dad played the violin and my mum the piano. When I was a child, my mum sent us to dance and piano lessons. I also learnt at the Evangelical Church and sang on the radio. My husband Mario played the guitar very well and had a wonderful tenor voice. We made a good duo. I could find the second voice for any bolero. »
[...]
« We rehearsed a couple of religious songs and sang during a mass led by a Jesuit priest. This inspired me the Catholic communion for the first time. I remember that that day we sang the canon “Dona nobis pacem”, which I had taught not only to the prisoners but also to the nuns. The nuns' choir and ours joined forces. The result was beautiful. We were a novelty. The following Sunday the church was full because people wanted to hear us sing. »
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