148 results where found for «May the Omelette Turn Over»


To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Place & date:
« I spent 45 days in the torture centre of Intendencia de Rancagua. Previously, I was detained with my brothers in the headquarters of the Cuartel de Investigaciones de Rancagua. »
[...]
« and the cherub turned my years into seventeen. »
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Amalia Rosa

Author:
Tino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band founded and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this Venezuelan folk song, known as joropo*, singing it at the weekly prison camp show. I dare say it was one of the favourite songs of the audience, comprised of political prisoners. »
[...]
« to La Guaira they’ll return »
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Coplas of El Yopo (Coplas de El Yopo)

Author:
Unknown. Traditional Venezuelan song. Popularised in Chile by Isabel and Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Place & date:
« A comrade whose last name was Saavedra (if I recall correctly) sung this song passionately. This song earned him the nickname of ‘El Yopo’ (also ‘chopo’), as is usual in popular culture. The tune was well-known in Chile, as sung by Ángel and Isabel Parra, who called it "Décimas del folklore venezolano" or "Coplas Venezolanas". It was one of the most popular songs in prison and was performed at many of our musical events. It was also sung at Ritoque and Puchuncaví. »
[...]
« because the guayabo* turns me mad. »
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Valparaíso

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« This song was written and sung in cell number 198 of Valparaíso’s former prison, that is to say, on the top floor of the main building, which was higher than the walls that surrounded it. This had several advantages for the prisoner, for if they perched on a stool to peer through the skylight, they could enjoy the company of a good part of the city during their hours of confinement. »
[...]
« The winds blow away, thorns return. »
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Run Run Went up North (Run Run se fue pa'l norte)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Ernesto Parra Navarrete
Place & date:
« Run Run ... On the big pitch, mild summer weather was in the air. But for us, aching from the torture, hungry, haggard, stinking, tattered, tired of our uncertain future, all we longed for was a breath of energy that would allow us to feel that we were still alive and that the feelings of our absent loving partners were present. »
[...]
« Walking along the running track, our heads bowed and trying to catch the breath needed for that moment, we suddenly heard a murmur greeting and singing to us “Run Run, se fue pa’l norte, no sé cuándo vendrá….” (Run Run went up North, I don’t know when he’ll come…). The whispering voices came from the sector where the female comrades were held. Our skin tingled and tears welled up in more than one of us. We turned to greet them and raising our arms in greeting, we sent them a comradely kiss. »
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Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Author:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Place & date:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« And when the guard returned, without a word, I began singing “Zamba para no morir” (Zamba so as not to die), the song performed by Mercedes Sosa. I've never had a great voice. Just in tune. And God knows where I found the strength, but I started singing in a cracked voice: »
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Answer Me

Author:
Gerhard Winkler and Fred Rauch. English lyrics by Carl Sigman. Recorded by Frankie Laine.
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« I sang this song alone in the National Stadium dressing rooms where I was held from September to November of 1973. This happened when the soldiers allowed artistic performances to take place in the converted dressing rooms while we waited our turn to be interrogated or after returning from interrogations. These were often torture sessions. »
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Dreams of my Imprisonment (Sueños de mi encierro)

Author:
Mario Patricio Cordero Cedraschi
Testimony by:
Mario Patricio Cordero Cedraschi
Place & date:
Cárcel de Valparaíso, Winter of 1975
« I’d spent two years in prison and there was no end in sight for my time in jail. I observed during visiting hours that many prisoners had children, a wife, family; in my case, however, having been arrested so young and just turned 19, I felt a growing concern that I’d die without bearing children, and never experience this wonderful human feeling. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Author:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Place & date:
« Preparations for that Wednesday night became more intense. It would be a different night. We women prisoners had secretly organised ourselves, but more importantly, we had also coordinated with the male prisoners. I’m not sure whether it was our idea or whether the men had proposed it. That detail is irrelevant now. »
[...]
« But that’s how it was. Some continued in prison while other others returned to their homes or were sent into exile. Few women, very few, ever returned. We prepared the New Year’s Eve dinner in advance. We had to be ready for the chosen hour: midnight - not a minute more, nor a minute less. »
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Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)

Author:
Vicente Fernández
Testimony by:
Jorge Montealegre Iturra
« At the Chacabucan artistic shows, Hugo Peñaloza sang tangos, including “Volver” (Return) by Gardel and Le Pera. This caused a lot of self-ironic laughter when he sang  “que veinte años no es nada” (twenty years is nothing) given our situation of uncertainty in which no one knew how long we’d be imprisoned. He also sang it during a farewell party for a group of comrades who were going to be released. To think of returning was tragicomic. And yet, four decades later, we returned. Of our own free will. »
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