148 results where found for «Melody by Jorge Peña Hen»


The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Author:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
José Selín Carrasco Vargas
« While we were imprisoned in Melinka, this song was sung every time that one of us was released. I remember a fellow prisoner nicknamed Bigote Molina (Moustache Molina) singing the song when we were going to Tres Álamos, from where we would be released a few days later. »
[...]
« It was exciting to hear the song when we said goodbye to someone, and even more when it was our turn. »
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You Can Blame Me (Échame a mí la culpa)

Author:
José Ángel Espinoza, aka Ferrusquillo
Testimony by:
Marcia Scantlebury
« Mexican songs - and this one in particular - have always moved me. When I shared a cell with Miriam Silva, a young woman who belonged to the Communist Youth, arrested by the DINA when she was handing out leaflets on the street, we killed time in an organised fashion to keep ourselves from getting depressed and overcome by anxiety due to an unknown fate. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Gabriela Durand
« I was 18, and already I had been tortured on the rack several times. One day I was with some other comrade prisoners, and as sometimes happened, the guards put some music on. They used to put the radio on, playing popular tunes of the time. For us young people, the songs were a bit corny, but still we enjoyed them; they were a relief. We always kept absolute silence. »
[...]
« Sometimes a guard would come and turn on the radio, they’d talk, and you could listen to the music. If the news came on they’d flick to another station. When they came to see us some of them would turn the volume up high, while other guards would turn it down, it all depended on the particular guard. There was one who specialised in bugging you by turning the volume up high, then down, then up again, and he also sang. It made us laugh, but we also knew it was his way of showing his power over us. »
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They Say the Homeland Is - Soldier's Song

Author:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio
Testimony by:
Sergio Reyes Soto
Place & date:
« This song, like so many others, was not at all “captive”. The revolutionary songs we sang behind bars imbued us with a sense of freedom. Rolando Alarcón, and later Quilapayún, introduced “Dicen que la patria es” (or “Canción de soldados”) to Chile. »
[...]
« Freedom songs travelled with those who sang them. This song travelled from Pudeto Military Base in Punta Arenas, to Dawson Island, to the Municipal Stadium occupied by the Air Force, and then to the Punta Arenas Jail. However, I don’t recall singing it much at the Cochrane Military Base next to Los Ciervos River, to the south of Punta Arenas. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Author:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Place & date:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
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Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Author:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Place & date:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. I was first held in the Stadium. I was 18 when they arrested me. »
[...]
« Since none of us could read music, in the rehearsals the director would say, “right: this part sounds like this, and this other part like that.” We had a good time in the rehearsals. All of us who were there enjoyed singing. We sang "O salutaris Hostia" at a number of events organised by the political prisoners, including one I remember when we went and sang to the common prisoners. We felt we had done a good deed. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Author:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico of a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. At 28 years of age, I found this title odd but also understandable, in light of the social esteem with which all tribes regard their healers. This tale has its origins there, as does a famous doctors’ strike, but that is another story. »
[...]
« The fact of the matter is that a while later we learned that an International Red Cross committee would visit our pavilion. The prisoners of the adjoining pavilion, who were about to leave for Mexico and would not be visited by the Red Cross, were keen to ensure that the visiting committee saw a list of the names of people who had disappeared by then. So they wrote the names on a piece of paper which they rolled up and pushed through a minuscule hole in the wall that separated both pavilions, near the back of the prison yard, next to the wash basins. »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Author:
lyrics: collective creation; music: “Jálame la pitita” by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We always sang this song when we were taken to Regimiento Arica. That was a torture centre. On our departure and return, the female prisoners who remained behind also sang the song. The lyrics were a collective effort, it was like our anthem. It was fun and we really liked it. »
[...]
« This prison had been a children's home before. It was run by the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd. People always said that these were "good" nuns. I don’t know if that’s the right word. It sticks in my throat that consecrated nuns should be able to accept female political prisoners. "It's because they were forced to" was the reason they gave us. It was very unpleasant when I went into the bathroom and the nuns stood there looking at me. It felt like torture. It’s terrible to be in prison. Once in a while they would get excited when we sang and would sing along with us, but I can't lose sight of the fact that they could have refused to receive political prisoners. »
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The Scholar (El letrado)

Author:
Quelentaro (Gastón and Eduardo Guzmán)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 – February 1974
« From the first time I heard it, I was impressed by the way the duo Quelentaro sang this song, which was also written by them. When I sang it, I always tried to sing it in their style. I never sang it on stage, only for myself or for small groups of friends strumming guitars together. »
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Friend (Amiga)

Author:
Miguel Bosé
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Place & date:
« When they arrested me I was 19 years old. I was one of the youngest political prisoners at the time in Arica. »
[...]
« We spoke through this hole and he would sing me “Amiga” (“Friend”) by Miguel Bosé when I would cry at sundown. I felt very helpless in this place. »
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