10 results where found for «Nino Bravo»


Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« While waiting in the grandstands to be interrogated for the first, second or more times, we would sing "Free" to those who were being lined up to be released. "Free" was a catharsis, a mixture of joy for those who were going and hope for those of us left behind. Unfortunately, the dictatorship and its civil and military henchmen employed the song for their own propaganda. »
[...]
« Nino Bravo »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« This song was performed in the Stadium grandstands by a worker from the Madeco factory: Peineta Vasquez, winner of a Song Festival that was organised at grassroots level, during the times when we were allowed to leave the spaces under the grandstands, inside the stadium,  to sunbathe, together with women from various countries, before they got sent off to the pool area. »
[...]
« Nino Bravo »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Place & date:
« I’m from Chol Chol, part of the Coihue community. I was arrested along with twelve other people and they took us to the Second Police Station of Temuco. I was 30 years old. It was a week before I was due to get married. »
[...]
« Nino Bravo »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Marianella Ubilla
Place & date:
« I was taken prisoner on 23 November 1973, at the University of Concepción. In the Regional Stadium of Concepción we had to sing the National Anthem every day. They’d always play military marching music. I think they did that to show that they were the bosses. »
[...]
« Nino Bravo »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Author:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing, and they gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« There were 15 women in our room. We began proposing songs. One person tried to invent a song that included a line that went something like: “my little bright-eyed lieutenant”, which the rest of the group vetoed. Then we thought of the song "Libre" ("Free", popularised by Nino Bravo), which the group also vetoed: we were locked in the room day and night, allowed out only a couple of times a day to go to the bathroom. »
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Gigi the Ladies’ Man (Gigi l’amoroso)

Author:
Jacqueline Misrahi, Lana Sebastian and Paul Sebastian. Popularised by Dalida.
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
« This song was used while the Military Intelligence Service (SIM) subjected me to cruel torture at a clandestine torture centre in the southern Chilean city of Los Ángeles. »
[...]
« Come, sing Gigi, that’s it, Bravo! »
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Casida of the Dark Pigeons (Casida de las palomas oscuras)

Author:
Federico García Lorca (words), Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Place & date:
« According to scientists, memory and music processing are situated in a deep, ancestral part of the brain, where it is zealously guarded. Perhaps this explains why even after our bodies have been destroyed down to the bone marrow, when nothing is left of us but the murky eyes of death, music and song appear. »
[...]
« “Bravo!”, croaked a man’s voice. “Very beautiful. I am a priest (Belgian? Dutch? I don't remember). “Do you think they will kill me?” the foreign-sounding voice asked me. “No…”. I never saw or heard anything about the Argentine woman or the European priest again. But I did learn that she survived. I still feel satisfaction at having embraced them with my song and my voice. »
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Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« Paper boat (barco de papel): We had a habit of wishing farewell to our comrades who were released or about to be transferred to other prisons. People who were not fortunate enough to be included in the group would gather around those who were about to leave, a ritual that sometimes included singing Julio Numhausser’s beautiful song “El barco de papel”. The first verse goes like this: “Se va el barco de papel por el mar de la esperanza, llevando un montón de sueños y los niños no lo alcanzan. Se va, se va y no volverá. Se va, se va a la libertad. (The paper boat sails to a sea of hope, carrying dreams and children can’t reach it. There it goes, there it goes, and it will never return. There it goes, there it goes to freedom.”). »
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Three white lilies (Tres blancos lirios)

Author:
Unknown composer. This song probably relates to European early-years pedagogy.
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
Place & date:
« They arrested me at my workplace in October 1973 . I was 31 years old and worked as a porter at a logging business in Chumpullo, near Valdivia. »
[...]
« For Christmas in 1973 we sang for the relatives that came to visit us. We sang “Arrorró mi niño, “Noche de Paz”, and “Señora doña María”. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Author:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« For Christmas, we got permission for our wives and children to come visit us. We sang “Noche de Paz”, “Señora Doña María” and “Arrorró mi niño”. When our visitors brought food, we would share it with the gendarmes. They were starving. They were conscripted youngsters. »
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