185 results where found for «Song of a Middling Man»


Song of a Middle-Class Man (Canción de un hombre medio)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« In our political discussions, we always spoke disdainfully of the middle class. In the view of the Marxist ideologues in prison, that sector of society supported the dictatorship and it was necessary to reverse that trend. »
[...]
« Song of a Middling Man »
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Love Song for a Disappeared Woman (Canción de amor a una desaparecida)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Daniela was the political codename of María Cecilia Labrín, a member of the MIR. Agents of the DINA arrested her at her home on Latadía Street in Santiago in August 1974. She has never been seen again. »
[...]
« Love Song for a Disappeared Woman (Canción de amor a una desaparecida) »
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I’m Not from Here - To my Comrade, my Love (No soy de aquí - A mi compañera)

Song by:
Facundo Cabral, with lyrics modified by a political prisoner
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« The choir of male prisoners sang a piece called 'A mi compañera' (To my comrade, my love) to the music of 'No soy de aquí, ni soy de allá' (I'm not from here, nor from there) by Facundo Cabral. »
[...]
« The female comrades who were prisoners replied to the chanting of the men held in the Regional Stadium with the song 'To my comrade' sung to the rhythm of the zamba 'Woman, child and friend' by Robustiano Figueroa Reyes. »
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Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Song by:
anonymous Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on 'Makhnovtchina', attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Experience in:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. »
[...]
« They began dragging him, and as they passed our room, Rosalía began to quietly sing 'Por llanuras y montañas...' ('Through valleys and over hills'). It was a way to speak to him and to try to give him strength; to tell him we were there and that we were accompanying him. In a sense, it was really his song. We had sung it together many times. »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Song by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. »
[...]
« My final wish was to transport myself, by hook or by crook, to those northern latitudes. That was how that song developed, that song I was unable to write down. There was no manuscript paper, as we were thoroughly searched and checked twice a day. It was not possible to write down, only to learn by heart. »
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Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Song by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the Policarpo Toro (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away. »
[...]
« 'Viento Errante ('Errant wind') (composed towards the end of that year during the improvised 'literary workshop' in which Salas, Montealegre, another prisoner and myself, tried to divert the raw pain of those hours, exploring some possible forms of 'existential meaning'), a song more unconscious than conscious, which attempted from its inception to idealise freedom in the shape of a woman without a defined face or name although, on the other hand, she embodied all the roles of a woman: mother, daughter, sister, girlfriend. »
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Sufferings (Dolencias)

Song by:
Víctor Valencia Nieto
Testimony by:
Domingo Chávez Navarro
Experience in:
« Marcelo Concha Bascuñán sang this song, which many of us liked. I personally knew Marcelo and we were both released from prison at the same time. I left the country, whereas Marcelo stayed in Chile. The DINA picked him up and since then he is one of so many disappeared people. »
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Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Song by:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Ceratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. »
[...]
« The noise was loud but I was doing my own thing. The only thing that would change the noise to music for me was this song. I have no idea how many times I listened to it. For me it was reiterative. »
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The Vargas War (La guerra de los Vargas)

Song by:
Celestino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Estadio Nacional, November 1973 - February 1974
« This old Venezuelan song, written by an unknown songwriter, and that has had many variations, was performed by Los de Chacabuco in during the camp’s weekly show. »
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The Letter (La carta)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Experience in:
« We set up a band with a group of fellow prisoners. They were young, university students. One of them had a guitar. »
[...]
« We also sang songs by Victor Jara ('Luchín'), Patricio Manns ('Arriba en la cordillera'), Inti-Illimani, Illapu, and Schwenke y Nilo. I still have the cassettes. When I listen to them the good memories come back to me. »
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