155 results where found for «After the War»


Shadows (Sombras)

Music piece by:
Rosario Sansores and Carlos Brito Benavides. Popularised in Chile by Lucho Barrios.
Testimony by:
Juan Carlos de Luján Peralta Aranguiz
« I arrived in this place as a war prisoner when I was 16 years old. »
[...]
« where during a warm afternoon »
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Answer Me

Music piece by:
Fred Rauch (lyrics) and Gerhard Winkler (music). English lyrics by Carl Sigman. Recorded by Frankie Laine.
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Detention in:
« I sang this song, as a soloist, in the dressing rooms of the National Stadium. »
[...]
« This happened when the soldiers allowed artistic performances to take place in the converted dressing rooms while we waited our turn to be interrogated or after returning from interrogations. These were often torture sessions. »
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To Sing by Improvising (Pa’ cantar de un improviso)

Music piece by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (Kila Chico)
« We made a Venezuelan cuatro from a large plank of wood attached to one of the walls of the "ranch" where we ate. »
[...]
« After much work, help and dedication we built a cuatro from that plank of wood, with the assistance of another prisoner who had some experience as a luthier. So we finally had a brand new, captivating and captive cuatro, to sing to the three hundred souls of Puchuncaví. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Music piece by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Detention in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« I entered one of the rooms to gather up the things on the floor and straighten up the place. I found a notebook with the owner’s name on the cover, Guacolda; she had been very meticulous about compiling the words of our songs. I still have the notebook in my house in London, and even though its pages have turned yellow with age, you can still read the lyrics of our songs. That night, dressed in our blue tracksuits, after having a bite to eat, we began to sing again. »
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Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Music piece by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Detention in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, September - December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and lyrical. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, the quena chose me. »
[...]
« I had been kidnapped and imprisoned for at least eight months when the following occurred. Bored and desolate, I’d go out onto the narrow courtyard in the afternoon and play the quena, always improvising melodies: long notes, silences. . . staccato notes and then longer notes. . . perhaps a huayno. »
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Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)

Music piece by:
Vicente Fernández
Testimony by:
Jorge Montealegre Iturra
« At the Chacabucan artistic shows, Hugo sang tangos, including 'Volver' (Return) by Gardel and Le Pera. »
[...]
« Names, ironies, places, omissions. After visiting the house where he lived as a prisoner, now filled with the ghosts of the past, like all the other houses there, Pollito Fonseca went to the theatre and sang one of his hits: the Mexican song 'Volver, volver, volver' ('Return, Return, Return') written by Fernando Z. Maldonado. »
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Casida of the Dark Pigeons (Casida de las palomas oscuras)

Music piece by:
Federico García Lorca (words), Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Detention in:
« According to scientists, memory and music processing are situated in a deep, ancestral part of the brain, where it is zealously guarded. »
[...]
« Perhaps this explains why even after our bodies have been destroyed down to the bone marrow, when nothing is left of us but the murky eyes of death, music and song appear. »
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We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Music piece by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Detention in:
« The parish priest at Buen Pastor played the accordion. He played so beautifully. Because I played the piano, I asked him if I could borrow it. 'I'll lend it to you' he said. »
[...]
« Learning all these songs on the accordion turned out to be a rather tiring task, all the more so since I could only do it in the afternoons when the girlies went to watch their beloved soap operas. »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Music piece by:
lyrics: collective creation; music: 'Jálame la pitita' by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Detention in:
« Let’s get going, would say “the lizards”, as we called the policemen, because they dress all in green. »
[...]
« After singing 'La rejita' in Mass, the squaddies of the Regiment and the priest asked us to sing it again. It became an anthem, a hit. »
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Words for Julia (Palabras para Julia)

Music piece by:
José Agustín Goytisolo (lyrics) and Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Detention in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, 1975 and 1976, until the closure of Tres Álamos
« There were so many of us women prisoners. Despite the circumstances, we had managed to invent our own world, one with our rules, according to what we thought and wanted for ourselves, our families and all the Chilean people. »
[...]
« One idea after another, one experience after another, and with so much enthusiasm, we created a way to sustain ourselves without depending on anyone else. »
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