70 results where found for «Cueca del Filistoque»


The Wall (La muralla)

Song by:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« We sang a lot of songs from the Spanish Civil War, for example “Dime dónde vas morena”, the Mexican song “Carabina 3030” and the Argentinian song “Balderrama”. We sang them when we already knew that they would not kill us, after a visit from a delegation of the United Nations. »
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They Say the Homeland Is - Soldier's Song

Song by:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio
Testimony by:
Sergio Reyes Soto
Experience in:
« This song, like so many others, was not at all “captive”. The revolutionary songs we sang behind bars imbued us with a sense of freedom. Rolando Alarcón, and later Quilapayún, introduced “Dicen que la patria es” (or “Canción de soldados”) to Chile. »
[...]
« They Say the Homeland Is - Soldier's Song (Dicen que la patria es - Canción del soldado) »
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Mid-Afternoon Love (Amor de media tarde)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song is dedicated to Graciela Navarro, who managed to made my prisoner's life more beautiful on the days we were allowed to receive visitors. During the week, when the hourly monotony became unbearable, she would use her free moments to deliver roses and brief love letters for me at the prison gate. »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« “Ñaca-ñaca” was an interjection we used at Camp Melinka whenever we wanted to signal and poke fun at any dark thought that might crossed our minds. That may be why it seemed the ideal name to give to the papier maché puppet that played the role of the mean king in the puppet stories we performed to entertain the children who came to visit their captive fathers. But Ñaca-Ñaca’s important role was more than that. The paper model was borrowed to perform the 'star role' in one of the cultural events we customarily staged every Friday. Events which, it should be pointed out, were attended only by captives and armed guards. It was a “Prisoners’ Show”, full of fantasy. »
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Go Tell It to the Rain (Ve y díselo a la lluvia)

Song by:
Clan 91
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We had a comrade who sang beautifully. He was called Peye and was a student at the State Technical University. I’d never met him before but later we becamoe great friends in the Compingin Camp on the island. »
[...]
« We formed a group called Alpha 4, specialising in more modern songs, mainly rock songs. We played some tremendous shows. It was really nice because when we returned to the barracks, we felt like true musicians. Peye wrote a song. I remember that he showed it to me. It was written with the Viña del Mar Song Festival in mind. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« As is widely known, many of the musical activities took place in prisons, in the concentration camps and in those places where prisoners were publicly acknowledged as such. I did find, during the month that I was held in Tres Álamos in December 1974, that the musical activities were very intensive and embodied a way for us to feel united among the other female comrades, to share hope, emotions and create a collective body that went beyond each individual. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Song by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico of a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. At 28 years of age, I found this title odd but also understandable, in light of the social esteem with which all tribes regard their healers. This tale has its origins there, as does a famous doctors’ strike, but that is another story. »
[...]
« As luck would have it, the person who took delivery of the piece of paper was one of the few non-political prisoners. His name was “Chico Pulento”, a member of the long criminal dynasty of the Fuentes Cancino gang, specialized in illegal gambling. He had been caught in possession of a false identification card and arrested under suspicion of being a “subversive”. Pulento knew nothing about the political prisoners’ organization, so he turned to his only friend of that group, a Mexican known as “Toluca”, who, in turn, handed the piece of paper to me. »
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Friend (Amiga)

Song by:
Miguel Bosé
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« When they arrested me I was 19 years old. I was one of the youngest political prisoners at the time in Arica. »
[...]
« Carolina Videla »
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Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Song by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of “lack of evidence”, after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« Carolina Videla »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
[...]
« Carolina Videla »
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