374 results where found for «Por qué llora la tarde»


Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Song by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of 'lack of evidence', after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde) »
[Read full testimony]

Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Experience in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« I still remember those intense moments when we sang so many songs. Gazing up at the sky, we sang 'Candombe para José', which we called 'El Negro José'. I understood that song as something new and different from the songs we usually sang. It seemed more contemporary to me and it made me feel in touch with my people outside the camp. The line 'en un pueblo olvidado no sé por qué' ('in a God-forsaken town, I don't know why') seemed connected with how I was feeling at that time. »
[Read full testimony]

May the Omelette Flip Over (Que la tortilla se vuelva)

Song by:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio. Popularized by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Claudio Melgarejo
Experience in:
« I spent a week in captivity, in November 1973. I didn’t hear many songs, but the most popular ones sung by my comrades were 'Venceremos' (We Shall be Victorious) and 'Que la tortilla se vuelva' (May the Omelette Flip Over), also known as 'The Tomato Song', which portrays the bosses' exploitation of the workers. »
[...]
« May the Omelette Flip Over (Que la tortilla se vuelva) »
[Read full testimony]

Gigi the Ladies’ Man (Gigi l’amoroso)

Song by:
Jacqueline Misrahi, Lana Sebastian and Paul Sebastian. Popularised by Dalida.
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
« This song was used while the Military Intelligence Service (SIM) subjected me to cruel torture at a clandestine torture centre in the southern Chilean city of Los Ángeles. »
[...]
« Jacqueline Misrahi, Lana Sebastian and Paul Sebastian. Popularised by Dalida. »
[Read full testimony]

We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. »
[...]
«  Work about the 1907 massacre of miners in the city of Iquique (Northern Chile). Composed by Luis Advis in 1969 and recorded by Quilapayún in 1970. »
[Read full testimony]

Filistoque

Song by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida (lyrics), Efraín Navarro (music)
Testimony by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida
« Filistoque is a real-life person in all his mighty height (1.90 metres tall). I always remember him laughing. In Chacabuco, we shared a house for nearly ten months. Around him, you were never allowed to become depressed or get into a stew over our situation. »
[Read full testimony]

Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Song by:
anonymous Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on 'Makhnovtchina', attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Experience in:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. »
[...]
« Few of us from that group survived. But the voices of Lumi Videla, María Cristina López-Stewart, Aldo and Carlos Pérez Vargas, the brothers Jorge Andrónicos Antequera  and Juan Carlos Andrónicos Antequera, Antonio Llidó, Ariel Salinas, Cecilia Bojanic and her husband Flavio Oyarzún, Francisco Aedo, Mario Calderón, Alfredo Rojas Castañeda, José Jara, Manuel Villalobos, and David Silberman continue to echo in our memory. »
[Read full testimony]

To Sing by Improvising (Pa’ cantar de un improviso)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (Kila Chico)
« We made a Venezuelan cuatro from a large plank of wood attached to one of the walls of the "ranch" where we ate. »
[...]
« Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (Kila Chico) »
[Read full testimony]

Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Song by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, September - December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and lyrical. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, the quena chose me. »
[...]
« Five years later, aged 14, I had already become the quena player of a quartet in ​​San Antonio. »
[Read full testimony]

Creole Mass – Gloria (Misa criolla - Gloria)

Song by:
Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« As far as I remember (and there may be other versions), Los de Chacabuco band was founded by Ángel Parra in response to a request by the Army chaplain Varela, who asked for assistance for the Mass he celebrated for both prisoners and soldiers. »
[Read full testimony]