139 results where found for «Why the afternoon cries»


Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Author:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Place & date:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of “lack of evidence”, after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« Why the afternoon cries »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Author:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of  September 11, 1973, I was at school correcting some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
[...]
« At four in the afternoon »
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I’m Not from Here - To my Comrade, my Love (No soy de aquí - A mi compañera)

Author:
Facundo Cabral, with lyrics modified by a political prisoner
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« The choir of male prisoners sang a piece called “A mi compañera” (To my comrade, my love) to the music of “No soy de aquí, ni soy de allá” (I'm not from here, or from there) by Facundo Cabral. I don’t remember who wrote the lyrics. But that’s how I recorded it in one of the ten notebooks I used to copy down songs during my imprisonment. »
[...]
« that you always sing in the afternoon, quietly, »
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The Black King (El rey negro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One cold winter night of 1975, the small clinic of Melinka, the Puchuncaví Detention Camp, became the setting for a touching story. »
[...]
« and meditating in the afternoon. »
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Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Author:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Place & date:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« My voice will break the afternoon »
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Run Run Went up North (Run Run se fue pa'l norte)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Ernesto Parra Navarrete
Place & date:
« Run Run ... In the large sports field, mild summer weather was in the air. But for us, aching from the torture, hungry, haggard, stinking, tattered, tired of our uncertain future, all we longed for was a breath of energy that would allow us to feel that we were still alive and that the feelings of our absent loving partners were present. »
[...]
« We would listen attentively for our names to be called out, in order to go and receive some personal item sent by our families, something to accompany us on our new journey into the unknown. As always, and in true military style, we had to march in a column. Carrying "all our stuff", at around 4 in the afternoon, a group was formed that consisted of all of us who had made the pilgrimage together from other detention and torture centres. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Boris Chornik Aberbuch
« The Puchuncaví detention camp’s daily routine included mandatory participation in the ceremonies of raising and taking down the Chilean flag on the flagpole at the entrance to the camp. »
[...]
« The flag was raised in the morning and taken down in the afternoon. In other words, the ceremony was repeated twice a day. »
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Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Author:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, between September and December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena (typical Andean flute) when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and full of song. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, it was the quena that chose me to play it. Five years later, aged 14, I had already become the quena player of a quartet in ​​San Antonio. »
[...]
« I had been kidnapped and imprisoned at least eight months when the following occurred. In the afternoon, bored and devastated, I’d go out onto the narrow courtyard enclosure and play the quena, always improvising melodies: long notes, silences. . . peals and then longer notes. . . perhaps a huayno, sounds that returned to the quena. »
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We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Author:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Place & date:
« The parish priest at Buen Pastor played the accordion. He played so beautifully. Because I played the piano, I asked him if I could borrow it. “I’ll lend it to you” he said. Discreetly I began to learn “Venceremos”, “La Internacional”, the National Anthem and the Anthem of the Police. They made us all learn the Anthem of the Police and I knew it from my dad, who was an officer. »
[...]
« Learning all these songs on the accordion turned out to be a rather tiring task, all the more so since I could only do it in the afternoons, when the girlies went to watch their beloved soap operas Marisa Cruces (title character of the Mexican soap opera La cruz de Marisa Cruces) had a sure hold on the heterogeneous audience made up of serious criminals, petty criminals, guards, traitors to the Fatherland and nuns. They would all cry about the vicissitudes protagonist endured. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Author:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) / Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
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