174 results where found for «National Anthem of Chile»


Futuristic Anthem (Himno futurista)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Patricio Polanco
Experience in:
« In 1973 and 1974, Pisagua was characterised by the harsh and cruel treatment of political prisoners. Singing was mandatory for prisoners, who were guarded by Army platoons, and it was also a means to avoid beatings and collective mistreatment. »
[...]
« Futuristic Anthem (Himno futurista) »
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I Can Trust the Lord (Puedo confiar en el Señor)

Song by:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Sigifredo Ramos Vásquez
Experience in:
Cárcel de Temuco, September - December 1973
« My experience during our captivity can be summed up in this personal observation. Protest songs were forbidden, so we had no other option than to sing religious songs. One religious song really struck a chord among my fellow prisoners, to such an extent that it took on the character of a true battle anthem. We sang it with such fervour that it became a genuine message of faith and hope for the much yearned-for freedom and justice. »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Song by:
lyrics: collective creation; music: “Jálame la pitita” by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We always sang this song when we were taken to Regimiento Arica. That was a torture centre. On our departure and return, the female prisoners who remained behind also sang the song. The lyrics were a collective effort, it was like our anthem. It was fun and we really liked it. »
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Moments (Los momentos)

Song by:
Eduardo Gatti
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« ‘Moments’ was a song sung by the female comrades whose partners were imprisoned on the other side of Tres Álamos, or were fugitives or disappeared. We all sang it, but it was like their anthem. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Luis Madariaga
Experience in:
« In prison we would sing this when a comrade was released or sent to exile. It was a powerful source of strength, solidarity and ironclad brotherhood, created during those long months in captivity, seeking an outlet for our hearts. I believe that that experience left a mark on all of us. »
[...]
« original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos. »
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Song of a Middle-Class Man (Canción de un hombre medio)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« In our political discussions, we always spoke disdainfully of the middle class. In the view of the Marxist ideologues in prison, that sector of society supported the dictatorship and it was necessary to reverse that trend. It was not an active support but rather a passive support that involved laying low and getting by with the dictatorship. »
[...]
« a middle-class Chilean and apolitical. »
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Coplas of El Yopo (Coplas de El Yopo)

Song by:
Unknown. Traditional Venezuelan song. Popularised in Chile by Isabel and Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« A comrade whose last name was Saavedra (if I recall correctly) sung this song passionately. This song earned him the nickname of ‘El Yopo’ (also ‘chopo’), as is usual in popular culture. The tune was well-known in Chile, as sung by Ángel and Isabel Parra, who called it "Décimas del folklore venezolano" or "Coplas Venezolanas". It was one of the most popular songs in prison and was performed at many of our musical events. It was also sung at Ritoque and Puchuncaví. »
[...]
« Unknown. Traditional Venezuelan song. Popularised in Chile by Isabel and Ángel Parra »
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Poet of Destiny (Poeta del destino)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song is a tribute to Miguel Enríquez, Secretary General of the Movement of the Revolutionary Left (MIR), who was gunned down by a commando of the dictatorship’s secret police on 5 October 1974. My own five-year militancy in that organisation resulted in my enormous respect for this individual. »
[...]
« a militant in Concepcion in Chile, »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Song by:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Jorge Grez Leuquén
« Working as a documentary film-maker for some years, I recorded the stories of some of the prisoners during the dictatorship. It was during some of these sessions that the song 'Tamo Daleko' reappeared; it had been sung numerous times on Dawson Island. This is a humble contribution from the south of the south. »
[...]
« Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916. »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Song by:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« At Compingin Camp on the island, Mario started telling us about the Spanish lyrics of the Yugoslav song 'Tamo daleko'. The song was not Croatian: it was Serbian. It brought back many memories to the Yugoslav emigrants. This song was sung in the Río Chico camp on Dawson Island, which was an enormous, Nazi-style camp. »
[...]
« Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916. »
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