127 results where found for «You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke)»


You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke) (Pagarás [El humo del cigarrillo])

Author:
Manuel Mantilla
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Place & date:
« The political prisoners were isolated but when they made us go down to the courtyard, we were with the common prisoners. They listened to the song ‘El humo del cigarillo’ on the radio. That is the first song I remember from the period during which I was imprisoned. »
[...]
« You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke) (Pagarás [El humo del cigarrillo]) »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
María Fedora Peña
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« “Look here, Maria Fedora. I’ve brought you a treasure...” - it was the voice of my brother Juan Cristián as he crossed the doorway of our mother’s house one morning in January 1983. Peering over the staircase banister, I saw him raise his right hand with something clenched inside. He was just back from a quick trip to La Serena, and I was spending my holidays in Chile. I had travelled home to show the family my beautiful baby girl, María Paz, my first child born in Caracas. »
[...]
« Furrowed brow, piercing gaze, ears alert to the message from his creative mind, translating the feelings of his soul into a melody, with the composure and determination to create beauty above and beyond the slander and betrayal, beyond the uncertainty of what tomorrow will bring. He writes feverishly on the wrapping of his pack of cigarettes, moistening again and again the phosphorous match tips with saliva: “Quick - if they dry out they'll be useless, and once the sun sets, I’ll be in the dark,” he might have thought. »
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The Little Cigarette (El cigarrito)

Author:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« During Christmas 1973, I was one of some 600 men and 100 women prisoners in Concepción Regional Stadium. The concentration camp officials allowed us to celebrate Christmas in the sports arena. To be precise, we were in one corner of the playing field and we used the pole vault pit as a stage. »
[...]
« I’m going to roll myself a cigarette »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Author:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of 11 September 1973, I was at school marking some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
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« None of us detainees knew what fate awaited us. If anyone asked for water they were ordered to pick up all the cigarette butts discarded by the policemen and only then, between insults, were allowed to drink from a tap. »
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What Will the Holy Father Say (Qué dirá el Santo Padre)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We sang songs that were popular at the time. We’d sing "What will the Holy Father say," especially the part that says "What will the Holy Father who lives in Rome say ... they are slitting the throat of his dove..." quite often, for example when someone was taken off to Regimiento Arica, which was a torture centre. We would also sing "La golondrina" (The swallow), which was very symbolic, because even though we were imprisoned, we could "fly", our thoughts soaring beyond the prison walls... »
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Blue Eyes (Ojos azules)

Author:
Manuel Casazola Huancco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January – February 1974
« This is the last track on the cassette recorded by the band Los de Chacabuco in the concentration camp; it was digitised in 2015. They played at the prisoners' weekly show. The song was very popular in Chile in the 1960s and many bands included it in their repertoire. The quena is played by Ricardo Yocelewski and the charango is played by Luis Cifuentes. »
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« You will cry when I leave, »
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Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Author:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed women political prisoners too. »
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« The flowers I shall give you if you will be my wife »
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Sinner, come to sweet Jesus (Pecador, ven al dulce Jesús)

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« One time a group of male and female evangelicals came to Teja Island to preach. They were taken to the visitors’ yard. Because we prisoners had nothing else to do, we went to see them. »
[...]
« and you will be forever happy »
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The Brief Space Where You Are Absent (El breve espacio en que no estás)

Author:
Pablo Milanés
Testimony by:
Vilma Rojas Toledo
Place & date:
Cárcel de Coronel, 1986 - 1988
« I recall that during my time as a political prisoner Pablo Milanés was one of our greatest companions. His songs filled us with life, helped us to keep breathing and living behind the bars imposed by Pinochet’s military dictatorship. Personally, I remember the song “El breve espacio en que no estás” (“The brief space where you are absent”) because it sparked such heated debate among my comrades that you would think we were trying to resolve a vital political issue. »
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« no one knows, the day after, what you will do »
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Song of the Seed and the Plant (Canción de la semilla y la planta)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« The history of the seed and the plant, of which this song forms part, was performed as a play to entertain our audience of children during a family visit to the prison. Imagination had no limits when it came to kindling a small flame of hope in our hearts. With the scarce resources available to us, we made costumes and dressed up as a jester, a gardener, a sun, and clowns, and thus attired we came out to meet our loved ones that day, much to the surprise of the soldiers, who watched us from a distance not understanding what was going on. »
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« “dig, dig, and you will find it”. »
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