80 results where found for «King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)»


Go Tell It to the Rain (Ve y díselo a la lluvia)

Song by:
Clan 91
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We had a comrade who sang beautifully. He was called Peye and was a student at the State Technical University. I’d never met him before but later we becamoe great friends in the Compingin Camp on the island. »
[...]
« When I met Peye again in the Alpha Barracks, he started singing the song "Ve y díselo a la lluvia" (Go tell it to the rain), in the most spectacular voice. He said to Trauco, me and someone else whose name I don’t remember, "Guys, I play, I sing, and you do the backing vocals”. We sang "ooooh": those were our backing vocals. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
« Once upon a time there was a good little wolf. … No. That’s another story. »
[...]
« For the first time in many days, he was in front of a window, albeit one that had solid cross-bars, allowing only the sight of a grey wall facing it. But it was a window nonetheless, and he could not stop looking through it as they were taking the chains off his hands. Once he was left alone and recovered the use of his hands, the first thing he did was open that window. At that moment the warm air of Santiago's autumn came into the cell at the same time as the Ode to joy, casually intoned by the prisoners of the adjacent prison section. »
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Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas)

Song by:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This is the first song on the cassette recorded at the Chacabuco camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, created by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group’s conductor. »
[...]
« Those taking part are named at the beginning of the recording. All ten members of the group took part. The colour photo displayed in other testimonies on the Cantos Cautivos archive shows nine of us, while Antonio was left out due to a framing error. Antonio does appear, along with the rest of the group, in the black-and-white photo included here [in the movie]. »
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We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Song by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« I was studying to be a chemistry teacher at the University of Chile in La Serena. I was 21 years old when I was arrested. I think I was picked up due to a specific fact. I was regularly sent copies of the El Rebelde (The Rebel) newspaper by train, in order to distribute them in parts of Region IV. »
[...]
« Music was always present: we were always walking around with a song in our voice. I think it was the only way to cope a little with prison life. One day a comrade, Lucía, arrived with a guitar. She always entertained us with music; with songs that we used to listen to before the coup, particularly those of the [Chilean] New Song Movement. We always sang “Venceremos” (We shall be victorious) by Quilapayún, in its original version. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« Another one of us had the idea of asking for the basketball court which was between the third pavilion (called Cuatro Álamos) and the barrack. And, wonder! They allowed us to play the knockout games there. We went out. It was a nice sunny day, the sky was blue. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Experience in:
« I spent 45 days in the torture centre of Intendencia de Rancagua. Previously, I was detained with my brothers in the headquarters of the Cuartel de Investigaciones de Rancagua. »
[...]
« At the Intendencia, after experiencing torture, we concentrated on drinking mate, singing, telling jokes, and improvising songs. »
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The Clock (El reloj)

Song by:
Roberto Cantoral
Testimony by:
Ana María Arenas
« The day I was captured, after the first torture session, I asked for permission to sing a Christmas carol, the name of which I cannot remember. I did it to let one of my captive friends know that I was also at the Venda Sexy. »
[...]
« We were all from the left and were looking to have a safe space to share music and ideas. »
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The Apparition (El aparecido)

Song by:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Pedro Mella Contreras
« When they took me out to physiotherapy treatment, I sang some verses of the song ‘The Apparition’ loudly: »
[...]
« We are survivors of a dictatorship. I am alive to recount what was taking place in that period in Chile. »
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Shadows (Sombras)

Song by:
Rosario Sansores and Carlos Brito Benavides. Popularised in Chile by Lucho Barrios.
Testimony by:
Juan Carlos de Luján Peralta Aranguiz
« I arrived in this place as a war prisoner when I was sixteen years old. »
[...]
« I stopped, looked at the black gate and remembered the song once more, also my comrades and my mother who located me here, after fourteen days of looking for me at other detention centres. »
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