147 results where found for «Manuscript by Jorge Peña Hen»


Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« Manuscript by Jorge Peña Hen »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
María Fedora Peña
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« “Look here, Maria Fedora. I’ve brought you a treasure...” - it was the voice of my brother Juan Cristián as he crossed the doorway of our mother’s house one morning in January 1983. Peering over the staircase banister, I saw him raise his right hand with something clenched inside. He was just back from a quick trip to La Serena, and I was spending my holidays in Chile. I had travelled home to show the family my beautiful baby girl, María Paz, my first child born in Caracas. »
[...]
« Melody by Jorge Peña Hen »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Author:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of 11 September 1973, I was at school marking some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
[...]
« I was missing my childhood and adolescence in the north, beside my mother. I dreamed and remembered the places where I grew up and the indigenous dishes she cooked. My final wish was to transport myself, by hook or by crook, to those northern latitudes. That was how that song developed, that song I was unable to write down. There was no manuscript paper, as we were thoroughly searched and checked twice a day. It was not possible to write down, only to learn by heart. »
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Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Author:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Place & date:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« At that point the guard stopped me and told me to stop buggering around with political ditties. That I should sing a cumbia or something by Roberto Carlos. I went dumb. Then they took us back to our cells, but before going in the guard said to me: “You’re stayin’ out ‘ere, for bein’ stubborn.” I spent a good while in the yard. I was afraid, cold, but I felt I had made a minimum act of resistance and that helped me. »
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Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Author:
Unknown. Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on "Makhnovtchina", attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Place & date:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. Our comrade and beloved friend Sergio Pérez Molina, leader of the MIR who had fallen into the hands of the DINA a few days earlier, was being tortured again. We had already seen him disfigured by the blows; they had even applied electricity to a bullet wound when they shot him at the time of his arrest. Moren Brito boasted that he had run a pick-up truck over Sergio’s body. »
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Dreams of my Imprisonment (Sueños de mi encierro)

Author:
Mario Patricio Cordero Cedraschi
Testimony by:
Mario Patricio Cordero Cedraschi
Place & date:
Cárcel de Valparaíso, Winter of 1975
« I’d spent two years in prison and there was no end in sight for my time in jail. I observed during visiting hours that many prisoners had children, a wife, family; in my case, however, having been arrested so young and just turned 19, I felt a growing concern that I’d die without bearing children, and never experience this wonderful human feeling. »
[...]
« This concern became a nightmare and led to these verses that turned into a song and filled the last page of my prison songbook, where I’d written down a number of ballads sung by other prisoners. For a while, a musician from Valparaíso shared my cell and taught me my first chords. When he went into exile he left me his guitar, which was my companion for another long year in captivity. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Author:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Place & date:
« Preparations for that Wednesday night became more intense. It would be a different night. We women prisoners had secretly organised ourselves, but more importantly, we had also coordinated with the male prisoners. I’m not sure whether it was our idea or whether the men had proposed it. That detail is irrelevant now. »
[...]
« Another important thing is that we had been able to get the word to Lola, as we shall call her here. She was barely more than a child. She was short, had black hair, a tinkling-bell laugh, and sparkling eyes. She lived in the neighbourhood nearby, on the other side of that long wall, now painted white. She had been with us a few months and when the day of her release came, she cried and cried and cried. At last she was getting out, but she was taking the sadness of leaving us behind with her. »
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Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)

Author:
Vicente Fernández
Testimony by:
Jorge Montealegre Iturra
« At the Chacabucan artistic shows, Hugo Peñaloza sang tangos, including “Volver” (Return) by Gardel and Le Pera. This caused a lot of self-ironic laughter when he sang  “que veinte años no es nada” (twenty years is nothing) given our situation of uncertainty in which no one knew how long we’d be imprisoned. He also sang it during a farewell party for a group of comrades who were going to be released. To think of returning was tragicomic. And yet, four decades later, we returned. Of our own free will. »
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Casida of the Dark Pigeons (Casida de las palomas oscuras)

Author:
Federico García Lorca (words), Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Place & date:
« According to scientists, memory and music processing are situated in a deep, ancestral part of the brain, where it is zealously guarded. Perhaps this explains why even after our bodies have been destroyed down to the bone marrow, when nothing is left of us but the murky eyes of death, music and song appear. »
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« Very early the next morning, I was awakened by the voice of a woman calling my name. Still half asleep, I thought it was Diana calling me from some place in the 'afterlife'. The voice cautiously persisted. The voice came from the right side of my cell. Naked, I went to the window (I always showered dressed wash the blood off my clothes, which I then hung to dry from the bars of the window.). »
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Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Author:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Cerratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. On the other hand, and this is more due to my family, I have always liked classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky. It stirs important things in me. It moves me. »
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« There was a lot of music at Venda, and very loud too. For me this was noise, except for one song that is engraved in my mind; it’s by Nydia Caro: "Hoy canto por cantar" (Today I sing just for the sake of singing). Why is it in my mind? Because the officers from the DINA secret police amused themselves with it. They would say to us “sing”, because singing also means grassing on someone. For me this was fresh aggression, because whenever they played this song, and they would put it on very loud, it was to pressure you to collaborate. This is the song I remember from Venda Sexy. I have listened to it a number of times since and it is the only thing I remember as music. »
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