896 results where found for «Y con brotes de mi siembra»


With the Sprouts I Sowed (Y con brotes de mi siembra)

Song by:
Andrés Rivanera (lyrics) and Eugenio Moglia (music). Popularized by Los Moros and Jorge Yáñez.
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In Chacabuco there were two theatres: one that was very beautiful and was linked to the old saltpetre works, where it is claimed (wrongly as it happens) that Caruso once performed; and another theatre that was inside the concentration camp. At the latter venue, every Sunday night at about 8 o’clock, a show was performed with the sole participation of the political prisoners and in the presence of the camp’s guards, and at the express invitation of the Council of Elders, a body that represented the comrades in captivity. »
[...]
« With the Sprouts I Sowed (Y con brotes de mi siembra) »
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Zamba of my Hope (Zamba de mi esperanza)

Song by:
Luis H. Profili
Testimony by:
Edgardo Carabantes Olivares
« Horacio Carabantes Olivares, my brother, was locked up in January 1975 at the Maipo regiment of Valparaíso, with a large group of male and female prisoners, all arrested by the DINA. »
[...]
« One day an officer approached the group and asked, in a confrontational tone, who could sing. Horacio, who had sung with a gorgeous voice since childhood, replied saying: I can sing. The officer commanded him to do so. So my brother raised his voice and sang "Zamba de mi esperanza" (Zamba of my Hope). »
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The Soldier (El soldado)

Song by:
Rafael Alberti (lyrics), Ángel Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« During Christmas 1973, approximately 660 men and 100 women were held as prisoners in the Concepción Regional Stadium. Concentration camp officials allowed us to celebrate Christmas on the pitch. We were in a corner of the pitch and we used the pole vault pit as a stage. Two professional radio broadcasters were excellent masters of ceremony, combining veiled messages with other more candid ones, all with a hefty dose of humour and good taste. They also recited poems. »
[...]
« The experience of prisoners in many concentration camps and jails throughout the country shows that engaging in cultural and artistic activity - whether it be creating and performing theatre, writing poems and stories, as well as essays, and producing crafts or music - was of vital importance in strengthening our personal and collective moral, an attitude of resistance and the sense of unity among political prisoners. Each time we engaged in artistic activity – with all the difficulties and limitations imposed by our difficult circumstance – it was an affirmation of humanity and life. Each accomplishment represented a small victory over the dictatorship. »
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Filistoque's Cueca (Cueca del Filistoque)

Song by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida (lyrics), Efraín Navarro (music)
Testimony by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida
Experience in:
« Filistoque is a real-life person in all his mighty height (1.90 metres tall). I always remember him laughing. In Chacabuco, we shared a house for nearly ten months. Around him, you were never allowed to become depressed or get into a stew over our situation. »
[...]
« Some of the guards were more receptive and it was not rare to see Filistoque in lively conversation with them; they were swayed by his happy demeanour to such an extent that he persuaded them that he could teach the soldiers how to march. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Song by:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
María Fedora Peña
Experience in:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« “Look here, Maria Fedora. I’ve brought you a treasure...” - it was the voice of my brother Juan Cristián as he crossed the doorway of our mother’s house one morning in January 1983. Peering over the staircase banister, I saw him raise his right hand with something clenched inside. He was just back from a quick trip to La Serena, and I was spending my holidays in Chile. I had travelled home to show the family my beautiful baby girl, María Paz, my first child born in Caracas. »
[...]
« “It’s something from Dad…. And it still has his scent,” said Juan Cristián, as he opened his hand to reveal a scrap of paper, neatly folded with the precision and thoroughness characteristic of my father in everything he did. “He composed it during his days in solitary confinement,” he added. “I have just received it, now, ten years later.” »
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Futuristic Anthem (Himno futurista)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Patricio Polanco
Experience in:
« In 1973 and 1974, Pisagua was characterised by the harsh and cruel treatment of political prisoners. Singing was mandatory for prisoners, who were guarded by Army platoons, and it was also a means to avoid beatings and collective mistreatment. »
[...]
« The repertory consisted of approximately 35 military anthems from all branches of the Armed Forces. To these military songs, we added a few songs or anthems that became a form of resistance and asserting our dignity, albeit not explicitly. The lyrics shown below sometimes varied a bit, but this became the anthem most sung by prisoners at the Pisagua concentration camp. »
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South-Eastern Storm (La Sudestada)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Experience in:
« While I was in solitary confinement in Cuatro Álamos, one day I noticed there was a large room at the end of the corridor, which, overnight, the "dinos" (members of the DINA secret police) had filled with prisoners. At the end of the day, these comrades organised quite a "jamboree": talking, sharing information, asking questions and singing. It was a frenetic activity of solidarity, support, courage and warmth. »
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Love Song (Canción de amor)

Song by:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – December 1973
« Ángel Parra organised and directed the band Los de Chacabuco until his release from prison. Angel only conducted the group, and never sang or played an instrument. The exception was his farewell concert, which was the only time he sang at Chacabuco. One of the songs he performed on that occasion was this one, dedicated to his wife. When Angel was released, Ernesto Parra became the group’s conductor. »
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Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« Breadcrumbs (migas de pan): These were the raw material we used in the interrogation centres for sculpting little figurines. This activity was important to the prisoners' minds occupied. In situations of extreme solitary confinement, when all contact with the outside world had been cut off, prisoners used these figurines to build a tiny bridge of communication with their fellow prisoners. A person in solitary confinement would place the figurine where others could see it, leaving leave a sign life. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Song by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
anónimo
Experience in:
« I was detained in Panguipulli on 24 September 1973, along with 17 other young people. I was a high school student. I was also working at the forestry and logging company of Huilo Huilo, which had been taken over by the working class. We were tortured for two or three days at the police station of Panguipulli. They left me unconscious. »
[...]
« Then they took us to a police station in Valdivia. In the stables they took our names and addresses, and then sent us to the prison on Teja Island. In the prison, one of the prisoners spent night and day in a dungeon. Despite being in solitary confinement, he would open his window and sing the National Anthem at full blast. We all went outside to have a look, even the guards. The prisoner didn’t sing the verse about the brave soldiers, out of protest I imagine. He sang for about four days. After that we heard nothing more about him. »
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