27 results where found for «Villa Grimaldi»


We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Author:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« I was studying to be a chemistry teacher at the University of Chile in La Serena. I was 21 years old when I was arrested. I think I was picked up due to a specific fact. I was regularly sent copies of the El Rebelde (The Rebel) newspaper by train, in order to distribute them in parts of Region IV. »
[...]
« The Good Shepherd Prison wasn’t a torture centre like Villa Grimaldi, Venda Sexy or other detention centres, although in any case the simple fact of being a prisoner was torture enough. We female inmates tried to make the situation as pleasant and comfortable as possible. There was an atmosphere of containment, and we tried really hard to make everyone feel good. We didn’t talk about what happened to us every time we were taken to Regimiento Arica, because that truly was a torture centre. »
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Recinto: Villa Grimaldi
There are 4 testimonies in this detention centre.
If you had a musical experience in this detention centre, please share it here!

Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Author:
Unknown. Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on "Makhnovtchina", attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Place & date:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. Our comrade and beloved friend Sergio Pérez Molina, leader of the MIR who had fallen into the hands of the DINA a few days earlier, was being tortured again. We had already seen him disfigured by the blows; they had even applied electricity to a bullet wound when they shot him at the time of his arrest. Moren Brito boasted that he had run a pick-up truck over Sergio’s body. »
[...]
« Villalobos, Manuel »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Author:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Jorge Grez Leuquén
« Working as a documentary film-maker for some years, I recorded the stories of some of the prisoners during the dictatorship. It was during some of these sessions that the song 'Tamo Daleko' reappeared; it had been sung numerous times on Dawson Island. This is a humble contribution from the south of the south. »
[...]
« Over there, far away
away by the sea
there is my village
there is my love. »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Author:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« At Compingin Camp on the island, Mario started telling us about the Spanish lyrics of the Yugoslav song 'Tamo daleko'. The song was not Croatian: it was Serbian. It brought back many memories to the Yugoslav emigrants. This song was sung in the Río Chico camp on Dawson Island, which was an enormous, Nazi-style camp. »
[...]
« Over there, far away
away by the sea
there is my village
there is my love. »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Author:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Place & date:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
[...]
« Of my village and my people. »
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The Black King (El rey negro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One cold winter night of 1975, the small clinic of Melinka, in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp, became the setting for a touching story. »
[...]
« A woman from the neighbouring village of Rungue, who was not a prisoner, gave birth to a daughter in that unusual place. Two political prisoners, both of them medical students, assisted the mother in labour while the other 208 prisoners slept in their respective cells, oblivious to what was happening. »
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Run Run Went up North (Run Run se fue pa'l norte)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Ernesto Parra Navarrete
Place & date:
« Run Run ... On the big pitch, mild summer weather was in the air. But for us, aching from the torture, hungry, haggard, stinking, tattered, tired of our uncertain future, all we longed for was a breath of energy that would allow us to feel that we were still alive and that the feelings of our absent loving partners were present. »
[...]
« Many of our fellow prisoners had already been transferred to the Santiago Public Prison, others to their towns and villages to be trialled trial locally, while a few were released and the women who were held in the same conditions in the pool area were transferred to a section of the Stadium stands. They waited, like the rest of us, for the loud speakers to inform us about our future situation. »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« On that occasion, our newly formed band (without a name) performed the following programme: "Soy del pueblo" (I am of the People) by Carlos Puebla; "El aparecido" (The Appeared) by Víctor Jara; "Los pueblos americanos" (The American Peoples) by Violeta Parra; "Vamos a Serchil" (Let's go to Serchil) by the Guatemalan Leopoldo Ramírez; "Del Norte vengo, Maruca" (I Come from the North, Maruca) by Ángel Parra (although some people say it was written by his mother); "Villancico nortino" (Northern Christmas Carol), a traditional song; and finally 'We Shall Overcome', written between 1950 and 1960 in the United States within the context of the Afro-American civil rights movement. In the prison we were acquainted with Joan Baez's version. We sang it in English and, of course, we explained its content and meaning. »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Author:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Place & date:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« That month in the summer of 1975, not so far off, the Viña del Mar Song Festival was taking place. Our prison camp, resembling a coastal village, decided to follow suit. That was how the prisoners organised the Ritoque Song Festival. My family had sent me a guitar. Improvising, I came across a few chords that sounded good to me, and I used them to create a melody. It was starting material. Armando, a medical student who was a good guitarist, contributed arpeggios and musical phrases with a nod to jazz. Manuel chipped in on his recorder with an arrangement that sounded interesting. Pedro, who was very experienced in percussion on his bongo, provided the rhythm. Jaime wrote the lyrics of the song. At length, he and I produced the vocals. »
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